The Beauty of Fish ‘n’ Chips

21/02/2011 at 10:04 am

Lyttelton Fisheries - geoftheref

Another guest post by the electrifying Alex Gilks:

“Hey Trev, I reckon we shud do up the front of the shop ta look somethink like the sea. Yeah a bit underwatery. But I really wonnit to look contempehry too. Corrugaded iron would look real good with the fridges. And it’s kinda friendly too eh.”

Google Maps Location.

Photo Creative Commons (Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic) 2010 Geof Wilson. Original here.

The Beauty of White Island

19/01/2011 at 11:39 pm

White Island - vtveen

Another guest post by the titillating Alex Gilks:

No, not the a snapshot of a Hutt Valley industrial estate – this is White Island, the site of NZ’s first full-scale World War II bombed buildings diorama. Weta Workshops tested many natural pigments before settling on the exact hue for mustard gas residue.

Google Maps Location.

Photo Creative Commons (Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic) 2010 vtveen. Original here.

The Beauty of Rugby. Player Sculptures. Made of Concrete.

18/01/2011 at 3:00 pm

Rugby Player Sculpture - Sids1

From the New Zealand Field Guide to Creating Regional Art:

“Outdoor sculpture may feature buxome, ovoid images of nature and fertility and sex; or monumental images of men playing sport, or riding horses, or standing around looking angry. But take care if combining these two incongruous styles. They may spawn uncomfortable results.”

Guest comment by the one and only Alex Gilks.

Exact Google Maps Location in Kaitaia, anybody?

Photo Creative Commons (Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic) 2010 Sids1. Original here.

Ravensbourne, Dunedin

19/06/2009 at 8:33 pm

Ravensbourne Gabions - Alex Gilks

Holding up these and many other walls are gabion baskets. They look like a bad art school project about industry vs nature, or some such. Here they are decorated with massive bolts. This is a pretty main route for tourism and freight, and the main route to many satellite communities. All the architects and urban designers were on holiday when they were planning this retaining wall, so the engineers just cracked on with it anyway.

Photo © 2009 Alex Gilks.